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Wine Sediments

Wellfed5_1I have another post on the Wine Sediments portion of the Wellfed network.  The Wine Sediments portion of the site can be found here.

In my post, I basically take two angles:
1)  Wine ratings should post ALL scores of all wines reviewed—in the interest of full disclosure
2)  The entire wine ratings game might be ready to overtaken by the people

In this post, I also throw-in a Lake Wobegon reference as contextual support for the fact that all of the wine ratings we see are above average. 

As an additional tid bit, I scanned an issue of Wine Spectator AFTER having written my current post (Jan. 31 - Feb 28 issue).  In the article called "The World of Wine in 2005," it lists the division of scores for ALL wines reviewed in 2005 and fully 46% of the 12,000 + wines reviewed scored an 85 - 89—or Very Good (A Wine with Special Qualities).

And, only 8% scored 75 - 79 (A drinkable wine that may have minor flaws).

A couple of years ago there was a little bit of a flap with grade inflation at Harvard University (NPR blurb here).

Does anybody think we have the same thing happening in wine, or at the least an opportunity for disinter-mediation from consumers?

Thanks to Mark Fisher, the editor of the Wine Sediments site also maintains Uncorked a blog companion to his wine pieces for the Dayton Daily News and an adjunct to his beat as a reporter for the same paper, he has graciously invited me to write for Wine Sediments as a guest columnist—a proposition I will take him up on with some regularity.   

When a glass of wine has a rough edge to it, it can be referred to as having some "angularity."  Mark’s writing only drives home positive "angularity"—as in he always has an interesting take.  His last post on wine ratings is in this vein and can be found here.

Pop over to the site and take a read.



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